Category Archives: Planning, Licensing

Revaluing parks and green spaces: measuring their economic and wellbeing value to individuals

By Fields in Trust (2018)

This report demonstrates that parks and green spaces across the UK provide people with over £34 billion of health and wellbeing benefits and generates savings to the NHS of at least £111 million per year. It calculates that parks provide a total economic value to each person in the UK of just over £30 per year and that this is higher for individuals from lower socio-economic groups and also from black and minority ethnic backgrounds.

Click here to view this report

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Developing new models of care in the PACS vanguard: a new national approach to large-scale change?

By The King’s Fund (2018)

The primary and acute care system (PACS) model is an attempt to bring about closer working between GPs, hospitals, community health professionals, social care and others. This report offers a unique set of first-hand perspectives into the experience of those leading a major programme at the national level and those living it at the local level. The insights shared will be invaluable to those constructing future national support programmes intended to facilitate transformation in local health and care systems.

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Public health practitioners’ views of the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ initiative and standards for its evaluation

Chisholm, A. et al. Journal of Public Health, 2018: doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy094

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Background
National Health Service England encourages staff to use everyday interactions with patients to discuss healthy lifestyle changes as part of the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ (MECC) approach. Although healthcare, government and public health organisations are now expected to adopt this approach, evidence is lacking about how MECC is currently implemented in practice. This study explored the views and experiences of those involved in designing, delivering and evaluating MECC.

Methods
We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 13 public health practitioners with a range of roles in implementing MECC across England. Interviews were conducted via telephone, transcribed verbatim and analysed using an inductive thematic approach.

Results
Four key themes emerged identifying factors accounting for variations in MECC implementation: (i) ‘design, quality and breadth of training’, (ii) ‘outcomes attended to and measured’, (iii) ‘engagement levels of trainees and trainers’ and (iv) ‘system-level influences’.

Conclusions
MECC is considered a valuable public health approach but because organisations interpret MECC differently, staff training varies in nature. Practitioners believe that implementation can be improved, and an evidence-base underpinning MECC developed, by sharing experiences more widely, introducing standardization to staff training and finding better methods for assessing meaningful outcomes.

The Prioritisation Framework: making the most of your budget

By Public Health England (2018)

Local public health teams are facing increasingly complex and challenging decisions over what services to invest in and disinvest from. The Prioritisation Framework is designed to help local authorities conduct a systematic prioritisation exercise, by greatly reducing the burden and complexity of the task.

The approach is based on Multi Criteria Decision Analysis, a recognised decision support technique which has been successfully used in a variety of contexts.

Throughout the tool, users are provided with extensive guidance and links to other relevant resources. A supporting materials pack is available from the PHE Health Economics team at healtheconomics@phe.gov.uk.

Click  here to view this tool

Does access to a demand-led evidence briefing service improve uptake and use of research evidence by health service commissioners? A controlled before and after study

Wilson, P.M. et al. BMC Implementation Science, 2017; 12(20)

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Abstract
Background
The Health and Social Care Act mandated research use as a core consideration of health service commissioning arrangements in England. We undertook a controlled before and after study to evaluate whether access to a demand-led evidence briefing service improved the use of research evidence by commissioners compared with less intensive and less targeted alternatives.

Methods
Nine Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in the North of England received one of three interventions: (A) access to an evidence briefing service; (B) contact plus an unsolicited push of non-tailored evidence; or (C) unsolicited push of non-tailored evidence. Data for the primary outcome measure were collected at baseline and 12 months using a survey instrument devised to assess an organisations’ ability to acquire, assess, adapt and apply research evidence to support decision-making. Documentary and observational evidence of the use of the outputs of the service were sought.

Results
Over the course of the study, the service addressed 24 topics raised by participating CCGs. At 12 months, the evidence briefing service was not associated with increases in CCG capacity to acquire, assess, adapt and apply research evidence to support decision-making, individual intentions to use research findings or perceptions of CCG relationships with researchers. Regardless of intervention received, participating CCGs indicated that they remained inconsistent in their research-seeking behaviours and in their capacity to acquire research. The informal nature of decision-making processes meant that there was little traceability of the use of evidence. Low baseline and follow-up response rates and missing data limit the reliability of the findings.

Conclusions
Access to a demand-led evidence briefing service did not improve the uptake and use of research evidence by NHS commissioners compared with less intensive and less targeted alternatives. Commissioners appear well intentioned but ad hoc users of research. Further research is required on the effects of interventions and strategies to build individual and organisational capacity to use research.

Three updated Cochrane Reviews assessing the effectiveness of influenza vaccines

By The Cochrane Library (2018)

Three Cochrane Reviews have been newly updated to incorporate the latest available evidence on vaccines for the prevention of influenza. These reviews, which focus on the prevention of influenza in healthy adults, healthy children, and in the elderly, form a long-running series by the same author team, and are available in full on the Cochrane Library:

Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults

Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy children

Vaccines for preventing influenza in the elderly

Click here to view these reviews

Using digital technology to improve the public’s health: a guide for local authorities

By  Local Government Association (2018)

Several case studies showing how various local authorities have used digital technologies to deliver value for money.

Click here to view these case studies