Tag Archives: Finance

The Prioritisation Framework: making the most of your budget

By Public Health England (2018)

Local public health teams are facing increasingly complex and challenging decisions over what services to invest in and disinvest from. The Prioritisation Framework is designed to help local authorities conduct a systematic prioritisation exercise, by greatly reducing the burden and complexity of the task.

The approach is based on Multi Criteria Decision Analysis, a recognised decision support technique which has been successfully used in a variety of contexts.

Throughout the tool, users are provided with extensive guidance and links to other relevant resources. A supporting materials pack is available from the PHE Health Economics team at healtheconomics@phe.gov.uk.

Click  here to view this tool

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Using digital technology to improve the public’s health: a guide for local authorities

By  Local Government Association (2018)

Several case studies showing how various local authorities have used digital technologies to deliver value for money.

Click here to view these case studies 

Right care: wrong answers

Dropkin, G. Journal of Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx136

Published: 03 November 2017

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Background

NHS RightCare is an NHS England programme describing itself as ‘a proven approach that delivers better patient outcomes’. It identifies opportunities for savings and quality improvements, comparing each Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) with the ‘Best 5’ of a fixed set of ‘Similar 10’ CCGs chosen using equally weighted demographic and deprivation indicators. This article tests whether these indicators are sufficient and equal weighting is appropriate, and evaluates significance.

Methods

Robust public data on lung, colorectal, and breast cancer mortality is modelled using the indicators and incidence. Peers chosen using the preferred models are compared with the Similar 10. Confidence intervals are obtained for comparator group averages. RightCare significance is simulated.

Results

Preferred models have unequally weighted covariates. Incidence is the strongest predictor of lung cancer mortality. The ‘Similar 10’ are inappropriate comparators. RightCare significance ignores variability of comparator outcomes, causing 12% Type I errors. Whilst RightCare shows 1842 annual avoidable lung cancer deaths in 80 CCGs, only 168 deaths in 8 CCGs appear exceptional using appropriate peers and CIs.

Conclusion

CCGs cannot expect to match the average performance of the RightCare ‘Best 5’. Until the methodology is examined with data of known quality, claims that RightCare is a ‘proven approach’ are unsubstantiated.

 

Current, future and avoidable costs of stroke in the UK – Societal costs of stroke in the next 20 years and potential returns from increased spending on research

By The Stroke Association (2017)

This report estimates that the current cost of stroke to the UK is £26 billion every year, a threefold increase from the previous estimated cost of £9 billion. The figures also predict that a growing and ageing population, increasing numbers of stroke survivors, and rising care costs are crucial factors behind the increasing financial burden of stroke over the next 20 years.

Click here to view this report

Big cuts planned to public health budgets

by The King’s Fund (2017)

Central government cuts have forced councils to reduce planned spending on vital public health services such as sexual health clinics and reducing harm from smoking, alcohol and drugs by £85 million, according to new analysis by The King’s Fund.

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Click here to view the King’s Fund analysis

NHS needs £9.5bn to transform

By BMA  (2017)

This analysis of the 44 STPs in England estimates that £9.5bn of capital funding is required to create the infrastructure to deliver the plans. The BMA sent out a series of FOI requests and have compiled information for each STP area on the financial needs required to implement the plans in each area. 

Click here to view this analysis

Extended hours in primary care linked to reductions in minor A&E attendances

By National Institute for Health Research (2016)

This briefing summarises the findings of a study that found that practices that offered additional appointments showed a reduction in the number of their patients attending emergency departments for minor conditions but that there was no overall reduction in emergency visits. Costs were reduced for emergency departments but by less than the cost of the additional appointments. These findings suggest additional appointments may help reduce minor A&E visits but may be more costly overall.

Click here to view this briefing