Monthly Archives: May 2017

Event in Manchester – Sustainability and transformation plans: moving towards implementation

Date: 6 Jun 2017

Time: 8.45am-4.30pm

Venue: Manchester Metropolitan University, Brooks Building, M15 6GX

Event type: Conference

Click here to find out more about the event

NHS England’s Next steps on the five year forward view, published in March, outlined the aim to use sustainability and transformation partnerships as the vehicle to make the ‘biggest national move to integrated care of any major western country’.

This event is for the leaders of primary care, community care, mental health, acute hospital, social care, housing, voluntary and public health services who are responsible for implementing the changes proposed in sustainability and transformation plans.

It has been designed to help local areas strengthen their proposals into fully developed plans and will tackle the most important questions facing them as they begin to consider how these changes will be implemented.

Evidence based policy making and the ‘art’ of commissioning – how English healthcare commissioners access and use information and academic research in ‘real life’ decision-making: an empirical qualitative study

Wye, L. et al. BMC Health Services Research, 2015; 15: 430

Click here to view this full text article

Abstract

Background
Policymakers such as English healthcare commissioners are encouraged to adopt ‘evidence-based policy-making’, with ‘evidence’ defined by researchers as academic research. To learn how academic research can influence policy, researchers need to know more about commissioning, commissioners’ information seeking behaviour and the role of research in their decisions.

Methods
In case studies of four commissioning organisations, we interviewed 52 people including clinical and managerial commissioners, observed 14 commissioning meetings and collected documentation e.g. meeting minutes and reports. Using constant comparison, data were coded, summarised and analysed to facilitate cross case comparison.

Results
The ‘art of commissioning’ entails juggling competing agendas, priorities, power relationships, demands and personal inclinations to build a persuasive, compelling case. Policymakers sought information to identify options, navigate ways through, justify decisions and convince others to approve and/or follow the suggested course. ‘Evidence-based policy-making’ usually meant pragmatic selection of ‘evidence’ such as best practice guidance, clinicians’ and users’ views of services and innovations from elsewhere. Inconclusive or negative research was unhelpful in developing policymaking plans and did not inform disinvestment decisions. Information was exchanged through conversations and stories, which were fast, flexible and suited the rapidly changing world of policymaking. Local data often trumped national or research-based evidence. Local evaluations were more useful than academic research.

Discussion
Commissioners are highly pragmatic and will only use information that helps them create a compelling case for action.Therefore, researchers need to start producing more useful information.

Conclusions
To influence policymakers’ decisions, researchers need to 1) learn more about local policymakers’ priorities 2) develop relationships of mutual benefit 3) use verbal instead of writtencommunication 4) work with intermediaries such as public health consultants and 5) co-produce local evaluations.

#StatusOfMind: social media and young people’s mental health and wellbeing

By Royal Society for Public Health (19th May 2017)

The report includes a league table of social media platforms according to their impact on young people’s mental health. YouTube tops the table as the most positive with Instagram and Snapchat coming out as the most detrimental to young people’s mental health and wellbeing.

Click here to download this report