Can’t find it? Let us help! New quick and easy access to evidence for local authority public health teams!

Free online training – click on the dates below to book 

Over 1300 full text journals purchased by PHE and the NHS national core content collection of journals is soon to be quickly and easily accessible to you in just one search, through provision of a new dedicated discovery service.

The bespoke discovery service, which will be available to you from 28 September, enables you to search across a range of quality public health research evidence using a single search box, with the same ease as you would a search-engine, yet with the assurance that you are browsing high quality, relevant resources. Better still, you benefit from seamless access to the full text without the need to go to multiple publisher websites or platforms.

It’s easy to use, and saves you time. You will be able to find the evidence you need to inform your professional decision-making. To find out more, use the links below to register for a free online introductory training session, to be held:

Don’t worry if you can’t make either of the above dates, you will be able to view a recording at your own convenience after 28 September.

Need some help? Email: libraries@phe.gov.uk or Telephone: (020) 368 20600

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Dementia in older age: barriers to primary prevention and factors

By Public Health England (2017)

These evidence reviews, authored by the Personal Social Services Research Unit at the London School of Economics, aim to aid commissioners and researchers make decisions about prioritisation of primary prevention measures relevant to dementia. The reviews find evidence that changing some behaviours in midlife can reduce the chances of getting dementia in older age.

Click here to view these reviews

Public health interventions may offer society a return on investment of £14 for each £1 spent

By NHS National Institute for Health Research (2017)

Each £1 invested in public health interventions could offer an average return on investment to the wider health and social care economy of £14.

This systematic review looked at 52 studies where the return on each £1 ranged from -£21.3 to £221. Legislative interventions such as sugar taxes, and health protection interventions such as vaccination programmes, gave the highest returns on investment. Interventions such as anti-stigma campaigns, blood pressure monitoring and early education programmes, provided smaller (but still favourable) returns. National campaigns offered greater returns than local campaigns. Falls prevention provided the quickest return, within 18 months.

These findings apply to high-income countries. There are some limitations to the data, as a variety of calculation techniques were used and the quality of the included studies varied. However, these are unlikely to alter the direction or approximate size of these effects. The study shows how cost-effective public health interventions can be and should inspire future research into how to better implement what is already known.

Click here to view the systematic review

Welfare confidentiality: sanctions, support and behaviour change

By Welfare Confidentiality Project (2016)

Below is the overview, summarising our key first wave findings on the effects and ethics of welfare conditionality. It draws on data from interviews with 52 policy stakeholders, 27 focus groups conducted with practitioners, and 480 ‘wave a’ qualitative longitudinal interviews with with nine groups of welfare service users in England.Overview

Below are nine first wave findings papers covering each of our study’s policy areas in more detail.

First wave findings: anti-social behaviour

First wave findings: disabled people

First wave findings: homelessness

First wave findings: jobseekers

First wave findings: lone parents

First wave findings: migrants

First wave findings: offenders

First wave findings: social tenants

First wave findings: Universal Credit

Sustainability and Transformation Plans: Five key questions for planners

By Centre for Health & the Public Interest (2017)

Click here to view this research

Big cuts planned to public health budgets

by The King’s Fund (2017)

Central government cuts have forced councils to reduce planned spending on vital public health services such as sexual health clinics and reducing harm from smoking, alcohol and drugs by £85 million, according to new analysis by The King’s Fund.

Click here to view this news

Click here to view the King’s Fund analysis

Delivery Costs Extra: Can STPs Survive Without The Funding They Need?

By BMA (2017)

This BMA report analyses all 44 STP plans. It highlights concerns around poor engagement with clinicians, patients and the public. It also identifies that there is a challenging timeline for STP implementation and little in the way of firm commitment to deliver the plans. The report is also accompanied by a paper summarising each STP plan and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

Click here to view this report